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EAT

indo-european eat est giant jotun icon

Old English "eoten" and Old Norse "jǫtunn" meant "a giant" or rather literally "an overeater, a glutton". Giants like the Bronze Age Greek Polyphēmos were considered to be the eaters of humans. A proof of that theroy lies also in the Basque language word "jatun" meaning "someone who eats a lot, a glutton" but also a "wolverine". Native South American Quechua word "jatun" means "big".

Fairy tales such as "Jack the Giant Killer" have formed a modern perception of giants as stupid and violent monsters, sometimes said to eat humans, while other giants tend to eat the livestock. The antagonist in "Jack and the Beanstalk" is often described as a giant.

In various Indo-European mythologies, gigantic peoples are featured as primeval creatures associated with chaos and the wild nature, and they are frequently in conflict with the gods, be they Olympian, Celtic, Hindu or Norse. Giants also often play similar roles in the mythologies and folklore of other, non Indo-European peoples, such as in the Nartian traditions.


EST-

Old Church Slavonic: ѣсти ⱑⱄⱅⰹ (ěsti)

Ancient Greek: ἐσθίω (esthíō)

Greek: εσθίω (esthío)

Latvian: ēst

Sudovian: ezd

Old Irish: estir

Lithuanian: ėsti ("to eat like an animal, to swallow, to gobble")


IST-

Old Prussian: īst, īstwei

Czech: jíst

Rusyn: ї́сти (jísty)

Ukrainian: ї́сти (jísty)


IES-

---> Chinese: 嘢食 (je sik) ("food")

Serbo-Croatian: је̏сти, jȅsti

Slovene: jésti

Slovak: jesť

Russian: есть (jestʹ)

Polish: jeść

Lower Sorbian: jěsć

Upper Sorbian: jěsć

Belarusian: е́сці (jésci), е́сьці (jésʹci)

Luxembourgish: iessen

Lower Sorbian: jěza ("food")

Belarusian: е́жа (jéža) ("meal")


ES-

---> Hungarian: eszem (esem) ("I eat")

---> Japanese: 餌, えさ, ゑさ (esa) ("animal food, feed")

Latin: ēsse

Hittite: e-ez-ši, e-za-az-zi

Old High German: ezzan

Middle High German: ëzzen, eszen

Alemannic German: ässe

Walser: essen, ässä

Bavarian: eisn, essn, èssn

Cimbrian: èzzan, èssan, ezzan

Mòcheno: èssn

Central Franconian: äße, esse

Hunsrik: esse

German: essen

Pennsylvania German: esse

Frisian Mooring: ääse

Old High German: ezzen ("to allow to eat, to pasture, graze")

German: Essen ("food")


ET-

---> Finnish: etsata ("to allow to eat, graze")

---> Hungarian: étel ("food")

Hittite: e-et-mi

Old English: etan

Middle English: eten, æten, etenn, eeten

Old Saxon: etan

Middle Low German: ēten

Low German: eten

Old Dutch: etan

Middle Dutch: ēten

Dutch: eten

Afrikaans: eet

Old Frisian: eta

Westrobothnian: eta

Gutnish: äte

Old Norse: eta

Icelandic: eta, éta

Faroese: eta

Norwegian Bokmål: ete

Norwegian Nynorsk: eta, ete

Old Swedish: æta

Swedish: äta

Old Danish: ætæ

Danish: æde

Old High German: etzen ("to allow to eat, to pasture, graze")

Middle High German: etzen ("to allow to eat, to pasture, graze")

Old English: ettan ("to allow to eat, to pasture, graze")

Old Frisian: etta ("to allow to eat, to pasture, graze")

West Frisian: ettjen, eattjen ("to allow to eat, to pasture, graze")

Middle Low German: etten ("to allow to eat, to pasture, graze")

Middle Dutch: etten ("to allow to eat, to pasture, graze")

Dutch: etten ("to allow to eat, to pasture, graze")

Alemannic German: etze ("to allow to eat, to pasture, graze")

German: ätzen, etzen ("to allow to eat, to pasture, graze")

Danish: ætse ("to allow to eat, to pasture, graze")

Dutch: etsen ("to allow to eat, to pasture, graze")

English: etch ("to allow to eat, to pasture, graze")

Old Norse: etja ("to allow to eat, to pasture, graze")

Faroese: etja ("to allow to eat, to pasture, graze")

Middle English: eten ("giant")

Scots: etin, etyn ("giant")

English: etten, ettin, eaton ("giant")

Middle Low German: eteninne ("giant")

Dutch: eten, etentje ("food")


ENT-

Old English: ent ("giant")

English: ent (Brought back by J. R. R. Tolkien)

Old Saxon: ent ("giant")


ED-

Ancient Greek: ἔδω (édō) ("I eat")

Latin: edō ("I eat")

Latin: ēdēre

Hittite: eidmi ("I eat")

Latvian: ēdiens ("food")

Scanian: æda


IED-

Upper Sorbian: jědź ("meal")

Russian: еда́ (jedá) ("food")

Slovak: jedlo ("food")

Polish: jedzenie ("food")


IET-

---> Finnish: jätti ("giant")

Saterland Frisian: iete

Westrobothnian: jäta, jetta

Gutnish: jeta

Elfdalian: jätå

Old Swedish: iætun, iætte ("giant")

Swedish: jätte ("giant")

Westrobothnian: getu ("giant")

Old Danish: iætæn ("giant")

Danish: jætte ("giant")

Scots: yetin ("giant")

Middle English: geten ("giant")


UT-

Old Armenian: ուտեմ (utem)

Armenian: ուտել (utel)


IT- ID-

English: eat

Scots: eat, eit, ete

Old Frisian: ita

West Frisian: ite

Frisian Föhr-Amrum: iidj

Gutnish: jite

Westrobothnian: ita

Gothic: 𐌹𐍄𐌰𐌽 (itan)

Irish: ithim

Rusyn: їджіня (jidžinja) ("food")

Czech: jidlo ("food")


AT- AD-

Sanskrit: अत्ति (átti)

Hittite: a-tu-e-ni, a-da-an-zi

Palaic: a-ta-a-an-ti

Luwian: aduna

Scots: aet

Gothic: 𐌰𐍄𐌾𐌰𐌽 (atjan) ("to allow to eat, to pasture, graze")

Middle High German: atzen ("to allow to eat, to pasture, graze")

Sanskrit: आदयति (ādáyati) ("feed")

Scanian: æda

Avestan: ad-


IAD-

Polish: jadło ("food")

Bulgarian: я́дене (jádene) ("meal")

Macedonian: јадење (jadenje) ("meal")

Macedonian: ја́де (jáde)


EAT-

English: eaton ("giant")

Scots: eattin ("giant")

Middle English: eatant ("giant")


AZ- AS-

Hittite: az-za-aš-te-e-ni

Cuneiform Luwian: az-za-aš-ti-iš, az-tu-u-wa-ri

Palaic: az-zi-ki-i

Walser: asse, assu

Old High German: azzen ("to allow to eat, to pasture, graze")


IOT-

Old Norse: jǫtunn ("giant")

Icelandic: jötunn ("giant")

Faroese: jøtun ("giant")

Norwegian: jotun ("giant")

English: jotun ("giant")

Middle English: yoten ("giant")


EOT-

Old English: eoten, ēoten ("giant")

Middle English: eotend ("giant")


A-

Limburgish: aete

Vilamovian: aosa


IAM-

Bulgarian: ям (jam)


Article created on the 21st of January 2019.


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